Puget Sound Business Journal Features Archetype Belltown

Developer envisions 'better urban experience' for site perched above Seattle's waterfront.

Burrard Properties is moving forward with an 11-story mixed-use residential development at the north end of Seattle’s new waterfront.

For nearly a decade developers have eyed on this part of downtown and other areas that were separated from the waterfront until the 2019 completion of the demolition of the Alaskan Way Viaduct, which has been replaced by the $3.3 billion Highway 99 tunnel.

Burrard Properties has updated its plan for Archetype, the 11-story project at a pivotal site where the new waterfront meets the heart of Belltown, which was a warehouse and semi-industrial district before it was gentrified starting in the 1980s.

The global Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron and Seattle-based Hewitt are designing Archetype, located at 2407 First Ave. There will be 180 residences, according to a Burrard spokesperson, who didn’t say whether the homes will be for rent or for sale. Retail and restaurant space will line First, and there will be “a semi-public laneway” leading to the rear alley.

In a news release, Burrard said the goal is to make “a better urban experience at this pivotal Seattle location.”

It previously was home to the nonprofit Low Income Housing Institute, which sold the nearly third-acre property to Burrard for $8.75 million two years ago.

According to the company, Archetype is entering the last stage of the city’s design review process and expects to start construction in mid- to late 2022. Swinerton is handling pre-construction services in a construction management capacity, a company spokesperson said.

The company did not provide an estimated cost or say whether it has an equity partner or lined up construction financing.

The new waterfront is under construction as part of the city’s $728 million Waterfront Seattle project. Scheduled for completion in 2024, it will be a promenade of public parks stretching 26 blocks to Lumen Field.

Archtetype is Burrard Properties’ second major Seattle project after the 41-story Nexus condo tower.

The building will have two distinct facades with copper and glass above two curved glass display cases to provide what the project team describes as a continuous active street front and mark the entry to the laneway, which will be off of cafe.

“Here the building opens toward Elliott Bay resulting in a stepped crescent shape, which brings light and air to the public terrace, laneway and alley below,” Simon Demeuse, partner at Herzog & de Meuron, said in a news release.

The firm has designed public facilities around the world, including San Francisco’s de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park.

Julia Nagele, principal and director of design for Hewitt, said Archetype draws from both historic neighboring buildings while delivering “unique and unexpected urban experiences that are so part of the Belltown character.”

To the south of the Archetype site is the Hull Building, a landmarked building that was built in 1889. Other historic buildings are nearby.

Source: Puget Sound Business Journal

Marc Stiles - Puget Sound Business Journal